Apple, The Feds, and The Good Fight.

On Monday 21st of March, Apple gave a keynote presentation on some of their news products. We heard about the advancements and breakthroughs already bearing fruit in the HealthKit API’s (leading to a fascinating discovery that there are likely to be several strands of type-2 diabetes for example), plus announcements on a new iPhone, iPad Pro, and much more besides.

But many wondered if the CEO Tim Cook would address the elephant in the room. The companies’ on-going battle with the FBI over the phone previously owned by the San Bernardino terrorist.

Rather than shy away from the debate, Tim Cook dealt with it head-on and admirably. Since this talk, it appears the Federal government has backed down, but it doesn’t stop this from being an important issue. To his credit, Cook didn’t wallow in the message, but made his points and moved on. You can find out more in the keynote below:

For a more detailed look at his musings, check out the unedited transcript of his talk with Nancy Gibbs and Lev Grossman for Time Magazine, here.

In the interview, Cook makes many salient points. The excerpt below summarises the situation nicely:

But at the end of the day, we’re going to fight the good fight not only for our customers but for the country. We’re in this bizarre position where we’re defending the civil liberties of the country against the government. Who would have ever thought this would happen?

Cook might be bemused at the fact it’s up to a company like Apple to fight this “good fight”, but it’s quite typical for private business and individuals to be the ones that curb the excessive over-reach of government. In fact, that’s usually the default situation.

I understand perfectly the concern over our safety. But it is never good enough to give up essential liberties in order to give us some possible, abstract and temporary security. Now, it appears the FBI are backing down, and don’t think they need Apple to do anything to help. That’s great. But this is a fight that will need to continue.

It’s interesting – and anecdotal, with exceptions on both sides – that generally those who are technology literate (including Google, Facebook, Twitter, et al), support Apple’s stance, and those who are arguing in favour of the Federal government are typically not as technology literate.

I don’t know if this helps clarify things in a simpler away, but let me use an analogy to explain the situation that doesn’t bring technology into the debate at all: Imagine that there was a very slim chance that a now deceased terrorist might – and only might – have left some information about future plans behind a locked door. The FBI go to the lock-maker and demand that they build a universal key that not only unlocks that one door, but could unlock every door in the country. And then the key will be duplicated thousands of times and given to thousands of federal employees.

As yourself, in that scenario, are we really any safer if the lock-maker complies? Or will his compliance make us all less safe?

Answer that question honestly, and whichever conclusion you reach, I think you’ll figure out what side of the debate you’re on.

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